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Perscriptions for Sleep: Lullabies of Mana Review

Every now and then I get a email that immediately intrigues me, in this case it was a 24 hour situation. Around 12 AM PST I received an add on Twitter by Scarlet Moon Productions, around 10 AM I received an email, asking if me if I would be interested in some awesome original video game inspired music. I was taken aback once I saw their roster of musicians, YouTube personalities, and general feeling of the company. It was pleasing, and humbling to read someone was interested in me reviewing their music.

Music is a big part of my life, as I am a human being with working ears. To say that is a bit, silly, who isn’t into music? When I say it though, I mean music taught me a lot about myself. It taught me emotions, it brought me joy, and it’s even broughten me sadness.

Music means a lot, to many people, and it’s most influential when you’re young. It shapes who you are, helps you create an identity, and allows you to escape from reality. This is one of the reasons why I’ve chosen to review GENTLE LOVE’s Prescription for Sleep: Lullabies for Mana.

Prescription for Sleep is as the band title insinuates; Gentle Love, the lovingly orchestrated tracks from SquareSoft SNES classic Secret of Mana by Metal Gear Solid Composer Norihiko Hibino and pianist AYAKI have lovingly taken on the work of Hiroki Kikuta and made it something marvelous, something delicate, and perfect for those long sleepless nights.

The entire album is a compilation of some memorable songs from Secret of Mana, with the exception of track 12 which is an original piece entitled “Memories of Mana”. Each track is layered perfectly, the piano and sax go so well together, it’s no wonder you’d call this series Prescription for Sleep. The record opens with “Angel’s Fear” which has a very delicate piano intro to introduce you to what this record is all about. When the sax does come in, it’s already taken you into the world they’ve created for you. Track 3 – “Into the Thick of It” captures the feeling of the original score from Secret of Mana pretty damn well, maybe it’s because it’s one I’m so accustomed to hearing it, but the moment it kicks in I feel like I’m exploring with a bit of nervousness.

In a Q&A Norhiko Hibino and AYAKI do say “Secret of the Arid Sands” is their favorite track, and it’s not hard to see why. The moodiness of the track is reminiscent of some classic jazz compositions, it’s really a fantastic track that you can tell they put a lot of emotion into. My personal favorite track has to be “A Dark Star”, the night I started writing this review and listening to this record was the night David Bowie passed away. While the news surprised me, having gotten to this track, and finding out about that news reminded me of David Bowie’s latest record that I had been wanting to check out.

It felt fitting, here I was listening to this amazing jazz compilation from one of the best SNES games, only to finish the record and go into David Bowie’s Black Star which had a similar styling as it was also very jazz influenced. Jazz always gets me, something about jazz really brings a lot of emotion out of me, and the artists who play it.

To say this record will put you to sleep is not at all a bad thing, and it’s not that it will put you to sleep, but it definitely could help. It really is just that soothing, it’s something to listen to on a gloomy day, a nice foggy morning, or while bathing. Truthfully, you can listen to it any time, and you wouldn’t be disappointed.

Prescription for Sleep is as the band title insinuates; Gentle Love, the lovingly orchestrated tracks from SquareSoft SNES classic Secret of Mana by Metal Gear Solid Composer Norihiko Hibino has lovingly taken on the work of Hiroki Kikuta and made it something marvelous, something delicate, and perfect for the young ears of your children, or yourself, or anyone who enjoys beautifully orchestrating soothing songs.

 

The Author

Johnny Ketchum

Johnny Ketchum

Writer and content creator from Denver Colorado, mostly knowledgable in the realm of retro video games he also creates music and music mixes.

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